javascript:; "Don't Use Coal Tar on Asphalt Pavement," Respected Asphalt Institute Recommends | Coal Tar Free America
 


The respected Asphalt Institute, which provides research and technical assistance to pavement managers and designer engineers primarily in the US, recommends against using coal tar sealants over asphalt.

This isn't the first technical paving source to recommend against the use of coal tar sealants for non-environmental reasons. A European study showed that coal tar sealants are prone to shrinkage cracking and accelerated pavement degradation.

Interesting since the coal tar sealant industry often says "without coal tar sealants, pavements will degrade and fall apart." Now the engineers and scientists who design these pavements say that asphalt pavements will do just fine without the application of coal tar sealant.

Here's what the website says:

How should driveways and parking lots be sealed?


A light application of a slow-setting asphalt emulsion diluted with water should be applied. In most cases, a dilution of one part emulsion to one part water is used. SS-1, SS-1h, CSS-1, or CSS-1h asphalt emulsions are typically used. Commercial sealers are also available. Those containing coal-tar compounds are not recommended. The diluted material is sprayed or squeegeed onto the surface in a thin, uniform coating. The total quantity of diluted sealant normally applied is 0.1 to 0.15 gallons per square yard. Exact quantities should be based on the surface texture, dryness, and degree of cracking or raveling.

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Mac said... February 3, 2012 at 10:43 AM

Similar to other material stuff, asphalt driveways get worn and damaged as time passes. Fixing them wouldn't only clean up the driveways and reduce possible injuries from happening, but it would also prevent cars from getting destroyed if they're left unrepaired.



Asphalt Canton

Dan said... February 9, 2012 at 4:19 PM

GSB-88 Sealer Binder is the first ever to receive an EPD (Environmental Product Declaration). It is in fact the perfect choice and solution to this growing toxic pollution problem. For more information on GSB-88 go to: http://geeasphalt.net/asphaltpreservation.asp
or www.geeasphalt.net

steve wallace said... March 28, 2013 at 4:00 PM

Similar to other material stuff, asphalt driveways get worn and damaged as time passes. Fixing them wouldn't only clean up the driveways and reduce possible injuries from happening, but it would also prevent cars from getting destroyed if they're left unrepaired. asphalt paving orland park il

John smith said... April 9, 2013 at 6:44 AM

Paving Products must be good because these are the materials of making pavement. Good raw materials help us to make good pavement. Thanks admin for sharing this post and I hope you post more huge post about paving in the future. Thanks!

asphalt paving said... September 19, 2013 at 3:53 PM

Interesting information! I wonder what if this is industry changing if they're saying you don't need to apply coal tar sealant.

Pavlos Lombardi said... February 3, 2015 at 9:39 PM

Thanks for the great advice. I recently just got my own paving unit, and I guess I'll have to start watching out for these kind of things. I'm really glad I knew this before hand, because I was actually pretty close to doing exactly what you said not too.
http://www.loflinpaving.com/services

nottar said... August 31, 2015 at 7:19 AM

Mac, Steve Wallace, and asphalt paving I really don't understand your comments.
At any rate the photo shows built up thick coal tar which really does destroy asphalt. If coal tar is applied in a thin coat and not resealed too soon it is effective in prolonging the life of the asphalt. Unfortunately it is usually applied too thick and too often. I see driveways everyday that have been ruined by coal tar, and the contractors just keep putting more on, which compounds the problem.

Coal tar does work, but the negatives outweigh the positives in my opinion. The health and environmental risks top the list of negatives.

 
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