As seen in USA Today, MSNBC, Dr. Oz, and the Chicago Tribune.

$type=ticker$count=12$cols=4$cate=0$sn=0

DC Ban Violator Successfully Removes Toxic Sealant!

The District of Columbia's Department of the Environment has completed their first remediation of a violation of their coal tar seal...



The District of Columbia's Department of the Environment has completed their first remediation of a violation of their coal tar sealant ban. The technique, shot blasting, has been described on this site (see What If CTS is on My Driveway?!) as a means to remove the material without causing additional pollution problems. I hope to post a video of the removal in DC soon. Congratulations to the District of Columbia!


October 20, 2011
District Orders Removal of Toxic Coal Tar Sealant From Private Parking Lot

Banned product a major source of pollution.
(WASHINGTON, DC) -- The District Department of the Environment (DDOE) announced today that a 23,000 square-foot privately-owned parking lot in Northeast DC, contaminated with toxic coal tar pavement, was successfully remediated on Sunday, October 16, 2011. 
Remediation of the lot, which drains into the Anacostia River, started on October 11, 2011 after a DDOE inspector issued a Notice of Violation to the property owner and contractor. The remediation process took 2.5 days, but was halted due to rain. The coal tar pavement product was removed with a shot blast machine, which uses steel beebees, or “shot,” to pulverize the sealant layer on the lot. The machine was equipped with a HEPA filter and vacuum to eliminate ambient dust release.
“I’m excited to see the swift and successful remediation of this site,” said DDOE Director Christophe A. G. Tulou. “Keeping highly toxic chemicals away from our local waterways help to ensure the health of our aquatic life as well as the public. That is our #1 priority.”  Director Tulou added that private property owners should always inquire about the products being used on their properties and not to permit contractors to use coal tar pavement products.


Coal tar pavement products are commonly used to seal parking lots and driveways and contain high levels of toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).  According to the Comprehensive Stormwater Management Enhancement Amendment Act of 2008, it is illegal to use, permit the use of, sell, or distribute coal tar pavement products in the District of Columbia as of July 1, 2009.  
“This is a huge step towards reducing PAH levels in District waterways,” said Councilmember Mary Cheh who sponsored the coal tar limitations section of the statute. “Eliminating coal tar pavement products is low-hanging fruit in reducing this major source of pollutant. I hope that other jurisdictions see the environmental benefits and follow suit.” The District is the only municipality in the Chesapeake Watershed to ban coal-tar-based sealants.
A 2010 study showed that dust from coal-tar-sealed parking lots contained 530 times more PAHs than dust from parking lots with other surface types.  This dust from coal-tar sealed parking lots contained about 7 times more PAHs than undiluted used motor oil, which has been recognized as having one of the highest PAH concentrations of all urban PAH sources. Rainwater washes these toxic PAH-containing sealant particles and dust down storm drains and into our local streams and rivers, threatening aquatic life in the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers and the Chesapeake Bay. 
For more information on the coal tar ban, visit http://ddoe.dc.gov/coaltarban or call the Mayor’s Citywide Call Center at 311.

COMMENTS

Stay informed...Get FREE updates on new coal tar bans!

* indicates required

Google Search of this Site

Name

2016,49,ABC's,8,Action,53,airport,3,alternatives,6,Althoff,1,AMA,1,American Coating Association,2,Anacostia,1,Andover,1,applicator,1,APWA,1,ASCE,1,Asphalt Institute,1,ASTM,1,Austin,27,Austin Chronicle,1,ban,135,bans,5,Baylor,9,benzo[a]pyrene,1,Boca Raton,1,Boone,3,Burke,1,California,11,CalTrans,1,Canada,6,cancer,23,Cheh,1,Chesapeake Bay,1,Chicago,7,Chicago Sun Times,1,Chicago Tribune,7,china,1,Cleveland,2,coffee-tea test,3,Congress,6,Connecticut,2,consumer,1,cost,11,costs,1,Dallas,1,Dane County,1,Data Quality,1,Daughtry,4,DC,1,DDT,1,Deep Water Horizon,1,Delaware,1,Department of Defense,1,Department of Interior,2,District of Columbia,7,Doggett,17,DuPage River Salt Creek,2,Ed Burke,1,Edwards Aquifer Authority,3,Ellison,2,Emancipation,1,enforcement,6,environmental justice,1,EPA,31,EU,1,FAA,6,FAQ,14,field test,1,fish kill,3,Florida,2,Frockt,2,German Federation,1,Gowanus,2,Great Lakes,4,Gregoire,1,Hansen,4,Hawthorne,2,health,62,Hoffman Estates,1,Home Depot,1,Huffman,7,IARC,1,Illinois,27,Indiana,2,industry,68,Jeffords,1,Kansas,3,Keating,2,Lindsay,2,Long Island,1,Lowes,1,Mackerer,1,Madison,1,Maine,9,map,2,Maryland,8,Massachusetts,3,McDermott,1,McHenry,1,McHenry County,2,MCPA,1,Men's Health,1,Michigan,9,Milwaukee,1,Minneapolis,1,Minnesota,32,Mississippi River,2,Missouri,6,Montgomery County,3,Morgan State,1,MPCA,23,MS4,1,MSDS,1,MSNBC,2,national pavement contractors association,1,National Research Council,1,New Hampshire,4,New York,14,New York Academy of Sciences,1,Niezgodski,1,NOAA,1,North Carolina,3,npca,1,NPDES,1,Ohio,2,Oklahoma,1,OSHA,1,PCTC,2,Pennsylvania,1,Pets,1,Physicians for Social Responsibility,4,price comparison,6,Quigley,2,Quinoline,1,Reader's Digest,2,Regs,6,relative potency factor,1,Republican,1,Rice,1,Rocky River,1,Rodale,2,Rosenthal,3,RT-12,1,San Antonio,7,San Diego,1,Scalze,3,schools,8,Science,57,shotblasting,3,Sierra Club,1,Sisisky,2,Slavins,1,Smoking,2,South Barrington,1,South Carolina,1,Springfield,7,Stormwater Magazine,1,Suffolk,2,Suffolk County,3,Texas,4,The Doctors TV Show,1,Today Show,1,Tom Bashara,3,Toronto,2,tribute,1,TSCA,2,Twitter,9,UConn,2,University of Michigan,1,US Department of Health and Human Services,1,USA TODAY,3,USGS,43,Video,18,Wall Street Journal,1,Walmart,1,Warner,1,Washington,8,Washington Environmental Council,2,Washington State University,1,Watauga Riverkeepers,1,WEF,3,wetland regulations,1,Wieckowski,1,williams,2,Winfield,2,Wisconsin,3,z2014,31,z2014 Summary,14,
ltr
item
Coal Tar Free America: DC Ban Violator Successfully Removes Toxic Sealant!
DC Ban Violator Successfully Removes Toxic Sealant!
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xsL9tmOyhWU/TrVG3UT40nI/AAAAAAAAB3k/XJQo_ubx4oY/s320/061031e0059.jpg
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xsL9tmOyhWU/TrVG3UT40nI/AAAAAAAAB3k/XJQo_ubx4oY/s72-c/061031e0059.jpg
Coal Tar Free America
https://coaltarfreeamerica.blogspot.com/2011/11/dc-toxic-sealant-removal-for-ban.html
https://coaltarfreeamerica.blogspot.com/
https://coaltarfreeamerica.blogspot.com/
https://coaltarfreeamerica.blogspot.com/2011/11/dc-toxic-sealant-removal-for-ban.html
true
5212735001005847783
UTF-8
Loaded All Posts Not found any posts VIEW ALL Readmore Reply Cancel reply Delete By Home PAGES POSTS View All RECOMMENDED FOR YOU LABEL ARCHIVE SEARCH ALL POSTS Not found any post match with your request Back Home Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat January February March April May June July August September October November December Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec just now 1 minute ago $$1$$ minutes ago 1 hour ago $$1$$ hours ago Yesterday $$1$$ days ago $$1$$ weeks ago more than 5 weeks ago Followers Follow THIS CONTENT IS PREMIUM Please share to unlock Copy All Code Select All Code All codes were copied to your clipboard Can not copy the codes / texts, please press [CTRL]+[C] (or CMD+C with Mac) to copy